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Cycling in Germany

Germany In A Nutshell

Germany is an easy place to cycle. It has some lovely bits and some less lovely bits. Choose your route carefully. Berlin is one of Europe's coolest cities.

Where and When I Went

Map of Germany

10th - 28th May 2011
26th - 31st July 2013
24th May - 1st June 2018

Germany's Scenery

Germany has some impressive beauty but there are some large tedious sections. Cycling due east from the Dutch border to Hannover is Dullsville. It improves slightly beyond there to Berlin and keeps improving as you turn southwards.

My route in 2018 was much more appealing with the stunning Black Forest, fairytale architecture in little cities like Tübingen before hitting the greatness of Munich and heading south into the Alps.

Scenery

Scenery

Germany's Road Quality

Roads are, as you'd expect, excellent and there are lots of cycle paths, usually of good quality but sometimes just lines painted on to broken pavements. You are expected to use them regardless of their crappiness. Drivers will remind you of this at volume should you forget.

Don't feel tempted to jump the lights. I heard of a pedestrian who was hit by a car while using a crossing that hadn't yet offered him a green man. The driver successfully sued the pedestrian for damage done to his car.

Road

Road

Road

Germany's Accommodation & Costs

Germany has lots of campsites scattered around the country. Of the thirteen I used in 2013, the average price was €10 (ranging from €5 - €12). In 2018, my eight campsites averaged €14 (ranging from €11 - €18). Hotels seemed disproportionately expensive compared to Germany's neighbours at an average in 2013 of €53 (ranging from €40 - €70).

Language

The older the person, the less likely they'll speak another language in addition to German. All educated people speak good English.

Neighbouring Countries

Germany has so many onward options, how will you ever choose? France, Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg, Poland, Denmark, Czech Republic, Switzerland and Austria.

Reasons To Go To Germany

Better food than you might be expecting, sausages, beer, Berlin, waterside nudity in the presence of fat people (if you're into that sort of thing).

Where Have You Written About Cycling In Germany?

No Place Like Home, Thank God Biking Broken Europe

What Do You Think? Your Comments

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Previous Comments

Geoff Clarkson on Sat, 19 Oct 19 11:18:13

Did you venture to Rugen Island? I’m hoping to cycle there from Uk via Amsterdam in mid 2021. How did you go on with wild camping and problems in Germany?

Steven Primrose-Smith on Sat, 19 Oct 19 14:31:16

Hi Geoff! Sorry, I'm not much use on this topic. I didn't visit Rugen Island, although it sounds fascinating, and I never wild camped in Germany (although I may be in 2020, depending on what happens on next year's ride). If you go there or experience wild camping, please let me know your experience.


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